Author Archives: Linda Rogers

Age 5 is a common age when parents start thinking about issuing an allowance to children.   The goal with an allowance is to teach children about personal finance and delayed gratification.  Children who practice delayed gratification tend to be more successful in life.  Thankfully, this is a skill that can be acquired with practice.   You may choose to tie the allowance to chores, or not.  There are two schools of thought on the topic, which you can read about here.  Personally, IRead More

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For working parents, cooking meals during the week can be a challenge.  For each $100 per month that you save from NOT eating out, you could have $100,452 in 30 years (assuming a 6% average return) in your bank account.  It is healthier for you and can minimize the additional expense of lunches (I make double the food we need and pack up the leftovers for everyone to take to school or work the next day). In my own household, aRead More

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Recent Graduates / Early Career Typically in your 20’s Cash Flow:  Allocate at least 20% of your gross income to long-term savings and / or paying off debt.  Now is the time to get money invested so it can compound. Start identifying spending habits and patterns by creating a budget or trying out the WholeWallet30. Tax Planning:  For many during this stage, it makes sense to save to a Roth versus pre-tax retirement vehicle since starting salaries tend to be lower than inRead More

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Dear Linda, My father was recently diagnosed with a serious progressive illness. After the initial shock, my siblings and I feel this is a good time to make sure his finances are in order, particularly with regards to estate planning. What do you recommend? Dear Reader, Have your father meet with an estate planning attorney licensed in his state. This type of lawyer specializes in making sure a client’s wishes, with regards to one’s finances, are met in the eventRead More

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I had an encounter recently with an annuity salesperson – we’ll call him John. John introduced himself as a financial advisor. I said I was a fee-only financial planner, and I don’t charge commissions. He said he didn’t either. The following is a paraphrase of our conversation. I share it with you because it is a good example of questions you should be asking investment professionals before you consider working with them. In particular, question those who sell products. ThisRead More

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Feeling uneasy with the global economy right now? Remember: Portfolios that include international exposure have historically performed better (and with less risk) than those that don’t. The goal of diversification is to have broad exposure to different areas that are not perfectly correlated (such as the US and international markets). When one part of the portfolio goes down, it is offset by another part that behaves differently. Trying to time movement in the market is not a viable strategy. WeRead More

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